London - Tank Drilling

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Just wanted to ask if anyone is around the London area with experience in tank drilling? Would like some help with mine and the local glass shops havnt been too helpful  :damn:

Paddone

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Reply #1

I haven't done it before but there are loads of how to videos online.



In this video tempered glass means toughened glass. You won't be able to cut a hole in toughened glass which has been heat treated to strengthen it.

Have you considered a hang on weir box instead ?


Gav

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Reply #2

I drilled my own tank , I used a a holesaw guide and a diamond hole saw which were under £20 for both from Amazon , some play dough and a jug of water to do the job . I had never drilled glass before doing this . I watched a couple of the u tube guides and read through others information and experiences on drilling their own tanks , at which I'm sure their was a good guide on this forum somewhere (perhaps someone could add the link if they know where) , the guide I used to keep the holes in the right place was a silverline 263520 .
I measured out where I wanted the holes to be , attached the clamp in place , I then built a small wall from the play dough around the cut and added some water inside . I then started drilling adding a little more water as necessary . Let the drill do the work don't push down .
For my weir I had an old tank that I cut a side out of and cut down to size with a glass cutter , which I then siliconed together and added inside the tank . There is a calculator on one of the American forums that give the amount of weir length required to the amount of flow you wish to run over it . I think I required 14" from memory , which would require to be longer if you decided to add a weir comb as this would block half the flow , I run mine without a comb and put guards in the Syphon and overflow pipes to prevent anything getting sucked in . you'd also need to confirm from the manufacturer that your tank doesn't have a tempered back before you start
Last Edit: Aug 12, 2017 9:04:52 am by Gav

Paddone

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Reply #3

Very neat Gav, I like the glass box and grey pipe which blends in with the backing!

Gav

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Reply #4

Thanks @Paddone  , I also ended up wrapping the inside of the weir also with backing .

Fishymo

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Reply #5

Wow thats a tidy job! Im leaning towards trying this out myself with the same approach you have. Is a weir essential?

Thanks:


Gav

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Reply #6

There's a few different ways of piping the water from tank to sump , most use a weir , this is so that should the pump stop the water above the pipes drains to the sump , If the pipes have access to all the water in the display , it will empty the display into the sump to the level of the pipes which in most instances is quite a bit of water and can cause the sump to spill over and flood hence the use of a weir to create a smaller amount of water . The weir also gives good surface break for gas exchange within the water . 
Some pipes are drilled up through the bottom of the tank , which generally make an easier more direct route to the sump , but requires the weir box to go down to the bottom of the tank . With my own I went through the back due to where the supports in the stand are . Which enables me to have a high level weir box , the down side is that the tank won't go as far back to the wall with the pipes down the back . Another method I may look into in the future is mounting the weir box on the back and running a coast to coast style weir , which would be narrower and look neater in the tank .
As far as pipes the simplest way is two pipes within the weir at two different heights , the shortest or first exposed to water is the main drain , the other higher pipe would only spill over in emergency . The biggest problem with this style is that as the water drains it pulls air into the pipe giving a gurgling sound as you'd get with a household drain ,
From this a valve can be fitted to the drain pipe entering the sump , known as a Herbie overflow , this does two things throttling back the flow of water lifts the height of water in the weir and also causes the pipe to run as a Syphon which does not draw any air and runs quiet , the valve is adjusted to match the speed of which the return pump is pumping back to the display .
There is also another called the bean animal overflow which consists of 3 pipes which is has a 2nd emergency drain which has the ability to also self convert to a Syphon .
I'll add some links describing as my explanations probably aren't great lol
Saltcorner: Article: DIY DURSO STANDPIPE
Herbie Overflow Plumbing Guide for Quiet Reef Aquariums - gmacreef

            BeanAnimal's Bar and Grill - Silent and Fail-Safe Overflow System
         




Gav

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Reply #7

Last Edit: Aug 16, 2017 5:32:20 pm by Gav

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