Graeme's 6x2x2 900L

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HK_Fuey

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Reply #240

Meet Donald Trump, my new bottom feeder :D
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Mike

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Reply #241

A cucumber, what type?

Mine was pseudocolochirus axiologus. Was stunning and fascinating to watch.

You know the trick they do wth their skin?  :D
Last Edit: Jan 31, 2017 7:06:00 pm by Mike
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HK_Fuey

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Reply #242

I may have bought more than I went for  :|
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HK_Fuey

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Reply #243

A cucumber, what type?
Well, I was aiming for Holothuria Atra.  I just asked for a black sea cucumber.  I assumed this was it, as it was buried in the sand at the LFS, and didn't have the pink belly that I've heard of on another black species.  However, having seen it move about a bit, it's not as smooth as the pics I've seen, and has the tentacles you can see in the photo.  So, I think it's Holothuria leucospilota - not as good, as it attaches to rocks and reaches out to sift from there.  I'll see how it goes in the frag tank, then decide whether to move it on to the DT, keep it in there, or sell it on.
Mine was pseudocolochirus axiologus. Was stunning and fascinating to watch.
Stunning.  But very toxic if it goes wrong.
You know the trick they do wth their skin?  :D
No, what's that then?
Last Edit: Jan 31, 2017 9:01:19 pm by HK_Fuey
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Marty

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Reply #244

Looks like you have had a shopping spree

HK_Fuey

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Reply #245

Yep.  Four new corals.  Will do pics tomorrow when they've settled in.  Two small, two large.  One is a freebie, as it was half dead - so we'll see.
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Mike

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Reply #246

Stunning.  But very toxic if it goes wrong.

Yes, undoubtedly one of the most attractive. They're native to the GBR and are pretty rare. I just got lucky finding it.

I knew of the risks of them dumping the toxins, but despite being nipped at occasionally by a coral beauty and also walking onto my unguarded heater (this was 10+ years ago, I know better now!) it sustained a deep flesh wound, which ultimately healed with a scar, and it didn't poison anything, so I think they only release the toxins in certain circumstances or as a very last resort. I guess it's not equipped neurologically to consider a slow application of heat from a static object an attack.

No, what's that then?

From memory, their skin has "bone dust" interlaced, which when under threat all joins up and goes hard, forming a kind of temporary exoskeleton to protect the soft innards.

You can try it (assuming all sea cucumbers do it) when it's feeding and comfortable, it's skin will be thin and it'll be squishy and full of water, if you disturb it, it'll shrink, expel the water, solidify and become firm, like a real cucumber.
Last Edit: Feb 1, 2017 9:39:28 am by Mike
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HK_Fuey

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Reply #247

@Mike - interesting stuff!

Sea apples are stunning.  Read quite a bit about sea cucumbers in my research before buying this one.  It seems that the more brightly coloured ones are almost all filter feeders, and hard to keep alive in home aquariums.  I was looking for a sand sifter to assist with eating diatoms (my nass snails just don't bother).  The sand sifter types are supposed to be excellent at that, but do need a big tank to supply enough food.

Yes, funny what things have evolved to deal with.  I imagine heat sources aren't very common on the barrier reef.

As for touching it - NO!  That's one of the things I've read that triggers them eviscerating their bowels  :|  I know what you mean about their skin now.  The 'bone dust' is catch collagen.  Apparently urchins spines and starfish legs use the same stuff.
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fr499y

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Reply #248

@Mike - interesting stuff!
As for touching it - NO!  That's one of the things I've read that triggers them eviscerating their bowels  :|  I know what you mean about their skin now.  The 'bone dust' is catch collagen.  Apparently urchins spines and starfish legs use the same stuff.
i love the oddballs in reefs. It's a shame most oddballs are hard to keep

Mike

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Reply #249

Yeah, you're right, mine slowly shrunk over many months until I gave it back to the LFS. Just like Mandarins and copperbands, etc it became a full time job trying to target feed it as mine only filter fed.

Providing you can blow the food into the flow path of water that's going to drift through it's feathery fingers, it'll stick and pull them into it's mouth, so at least you can be certain when you do target feed it, that it is actually getting the food you're giving it, but it was all too little to maintain it.  :'(

Still, those who try the oddballs, do their very best and still lose them, go on to advise others against them thereon.  :heyyy:
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HK_Fuey

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Reply #250

My new corals. A quarter of a huge ultra Ausie fungia, a pajama (cup/scroll coral), red digi, green birds nest (maybe).

SPS people, what do you make of the red digi? Should I frag that white bit off?  It was a freebie. Also, I need an ID on the other one. I think it's seriatopora, but not sure.
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fishface

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Reply #251

@Mike - interesting stuff!

Sea apples are stunning.  Read quite a bit about sea cucumbers in my research before buying this one.  It seems that the more brightly coloured ones are almost all filter feeders, and hard to keep alive in home aquariums.  I was looking for a sand sifter to assist with eating diatoms (my nass snails just don't bother).  The sand sifter types are supposed to be excellent at that, but do need a big tank to supply enough food.

Yes, funny what things have evolved to deal with.  I imagine heat sources aren't very common on the barrier reef.

As for touching it - NO!  That's one of the things I've read that triggers them eviscerating their bowels  :|  I know what you mean about their skin now.  The 'bone dust' is catch collagen.  Apparently urchins spines and starfish legs use the same stuff.
I had a sea apple a few years back .went away for weekend and it got stuck to powerheads and whiped out my tank

HK_Fuey

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Reply #252

First person I know that's had that happen, but there are loads of stories of it happening. The sand sifters are supposed to be far less toxic.
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Mike

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Reply #253

Yeah, I suppose being pulled into a powerhead would be seen as an attack much more obviously than a heater burn.
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fr499y

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Reply #254

bottom is a guttatus :) and i'd lob the dead bit off :)

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