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Brooklynella Hostilis?

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Looking at my Gold flash wrasse this morning I initially noticed a couple of weird white bits on the surface of its skin.
At first I figured it might be a bit of sand from sleeping close to the sand bed.
On closer inspection I wondered if it was some kind of parasite hanging out of the fish as it looked almost "stringy" (if that makes sense) like the very tip of a worm or something.
Looking more closely I noticed that the surface of its scales looks kind of cloudy or patchy.
I read up on marine velvet but it was described as more of a gold appearance whereas this looks more grey in appearance.
The Brooklynella theory seems to be more fitting and the "stringy" areas...well it does mention that the mucus strands can appear to trail behind the fish as it swims.

I have just set up a QT for some Picasso clowns which I have reserved at the LFS. I am now going to have to use this as a hospital tank and probably "un-reserve" the clowns (gutted as they are a cracking decent sized pair  :'( )
What is the most effective off the LFS shelf QT/hospital tank treatment for Brooklynella at the moment?
I have read that a course of freshwater dips will help also.

How would you guys deal with it?

Thanks.
Last Edit: Feb 2, 2016 9:29:10 am by Steveanem

HK_Fuey

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Reply #1

Have a read of this:
Brooklynella hostilis and Uronema marinum | UltimateReef.Com

Do a fresh water dip (method in the article above) straight away.

Get some formalin 37% from a shop that sells Koi.  Some products have formalin in, at a lower percentage, but they are no good for Brook. 
Quote from: edbailey on UR
]If the formalin is 37% formaldehyde then you would dose it at 0.05 to 0.1 ml per litre. Are you doing it as a single bath? Or as a longer course?

Personally I would do a bath at 0.05ml/l for 6 hours and add plenty of aeration.

The other way to treat it is with chloroquine phosphate.  It'll take a few days to arrive, but you can order it from pharmacies online - it's called Avloclor.  Say you're travelling to the Dominican Republic, as that is one of few places where the mosquitos have not become resistant to Chloroquine Phosphate.  I have some on the way to my house, but I guess it would be quicker to order some from Lloyds, than wait for mine to arrive, then post you some. 

Freshwater dips will be essential until you get something to treat it with long term.  I'm 90% sure that's what killed all my fish with 24hrs of seeing the first symptoms.

Good luck!
Last Edit: Feb 7, 2016 1:32:41 pm by HK_Fuey

HK_Fuey

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Reply #2

If you manage to get some formalin:

HK_Fuey

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Reply #3

Might be worth sticking a photo up on here too, so we can help identify the disease too.

Steveanem

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Reply #4

Thanks for the replies.

I am increasingly hopeful that (embarrassingly ) I may have been too quick to jump to conclusions.
I have kept a close eye on the fish over the course of the day and the cloudy appearance of the scales seems to have cleared up. Of the two 'stringy' sort of flaky areas one has disappeared.
The fish appears to have returned to its normal vibrancy and is apparently breathing normally and I also eating ok.


I am now wondering if this is a lack of knowledge on my part. Is it normal/usual for this type of fish to fade at night in a similar fashion to Anthias and Fox face rabbit fish? It was early morning and the lights had not been on long when I first noticed the patchy appearance.
I am now wondering if the damage to the scales could have just been an abrasion from scraping against the rock work as my Labouttes has occasionally harassed him and tried to impose his authority.

I do not want to be complacent so I will monitor the fish closely but it might just be me being too cautious as ,since my previous tank crash, I tend to worry and fear the worst!

Thank you for taking the time to reply, your time was not wasted as the information you have passed on will no doubt be of use at some point in time, but hopefully not right now. Fingers crossed.

HK_Fuey

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Reply #5

I'm not sure about that specific fish, but a lot of wrasse produce a mucus bubble to sleep in (disguises their smell from predators at night).  Could it have been this?

HK_Fuey

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Reply #6

What's the latin name for the wrasse?

HK_Fuey

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Reply #7

The Fairy Wrasses: Cirrhilabrus spp. -  Reefkeeping.com
Quote
Fairy wrasses are found throughout tropical Indo-Pacific shallow waters swimming two to eight feet above sand or rocky substrata. Most fairy wrasses can be found in depths ranging from 10 - 75 feet, although some can be found deeper than 150 feet. These fish are easily frightened and hide within nearby coral or rockwork until the threat has left the area. They are diurnally active and sleep at night pinned within rockwork, protected by a mucus cocoon which they secrete around themselves. A similar cocoon in Parrotfish was demonstrated to protect the sleeping fish by masking its scent from the sensitive olfactory nerves of nocturnal predators. It is presumed that the cocoon performs the same function for Cirrhilabrus.

Thanks:


Steveanem

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Reply #8

What's the latin name for the wrasse?

Cirrhilabrus aurantidorsalis).

Steveanem

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Reply #9

The Fairy Wrasses: Cirrhilabrus spp. -  Reefkeeping.com

"Well I'll be damned! You are THE man! Nice work. Thanks for that.
That would certainly explain it as it was early morning shortly after lights came up...

Gilly

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Reply #10

That's a relief, and you can still get your clowns😃 Which LFS do you use Steve?

Steveanem

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Reply #11

That's a relief, and you can still get your clowns😃 Which LFS do you use Steve?

Haha yes it certainly is @Gilly! I've got the makeshift QT set up on the kitchen side. Old Boyu 450TL with 80% new salty & 20% tank water. So the last thing I want to find is a diseased DT. I had a couple of sponges, originally from the Boyu, in the sump for at least a month with restocking in mind.
Been adding the Seachem "Seed" stuff each day. Not sure if I should add a small piece of Live rock out of the sump also...or not.
Do I need to "feed" the QT if the clowns aren't coming til the weekend?

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Reply #12

When I ran a qt I added some live rock just to make the fish more relaxed. On saying that not sure it worked as I had 1 jumper (a wrasse) and 1 death (coral beauty). After that I gave up on qt and just risked it. Can't decide if I'm going to qt this time round, I was put off last time. I have a external filter now which I didn't have then so i won't need the internal in there which will free up some space and presumably be better filtration.
Which LFS are you getting the clowns from?

HK_Fuey

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Reply #13

You can add liverock, but be prepared to sacrifice it if you find disease.  I.e. you may need to treat the tank with copper = kills everything in liverock, causing a massive spike.  You may need to  use an anti-bacterial treatment = kills the bacteria in the liverock, causing a massive spike.

For a wormer, you can treat in a few hours in a bucket, so do that rather than in the tank.

However, if you go down the Chloroquine Phosphate route (as I plan to in the next few days), then you can leave liverock in with that.  It doesn't kill the bacteria or the worms in the rock.  I will also treat with Sera Tremazol to worm the fish in a bucket, and if I see visible parasites, I'll do freshwater (pH adjusted) dips in a bucket.

Watch out tonight, after lights down, for the cocoon around the wrasse.   I used to have a sixline that did it.  It's cool to see.

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HK_Fuey

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Reply #14

Oh, I should have said, you obviously can't take the liverock out once you spot disease and put it back in your main tank, as you'd be transferring the disease.  You could remove it and stick it in another bucket with a heater and pump, and leave it fallow for 12 weeks (that'll kill most parasites).

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