Reef photography

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Ok guys I  want some great pics of me new system . I have done a wee bit of photography (portrait)  on amateur level but for the life of me I cant get any really good pics of my inhabitants! !!  Played with ISO . Shutter . Aperture  priorities and still cant get good  sharp images . Any tips people

punchyjam

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Reply #1

I am.using nikon d5000 with speedlight  btw

mav469

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Reply #2

ISO needs to be very low 100 on your camera really. I shoot up to 400 but I'm shooting full frame. Personally I shoot aperture as wide open as I can but depends on what depth of field you want. As you probably know with your ISO set at 100 shutter speed and aperture need to be at a level to allow the image to be bright enough. I don't use my speedlight as I feel it whitens the colours too much. What lens do you have?

Most important thing is keep the lens as level as you can with the glass as any angle difference between the glass tank and the lens will cause the light to refract and make the image look a little blurry.

Due you have the ability to shoot in raw and edit? If so what editing software do you have?

punchyjam

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Reply #3

I shoot im raw anyway. I have photoshop for editing . Just wondered if there was some magic rule of reef photography I was missing . Cheers

mav469

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Reply #4

If you shoot in raw you can adjust the sliders in Photoshop to increase saturation a little and tweak the white balance levels etc. A vignette always makes a reef photo look nice also.

Mike

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Reply #5

Hi,

The single most important thing to adjust is the white balance. That's why pictures on camera phones look so colourless and blue.

As you shoot raw you're in the best position to make these adjustments, as they're not adjustments, merely changing the way the photo will be produced from the raw data.

Try Lightroom from Adobe instead of Photoshop. Get a trial, you'll immediately never use photoshop for photography again :)

As said, lowest ISO is important for colour, turn off flow to slow corals etc down which means you can get away with a slower shutter speed, which gives you window for lower ISO.

As for aperture, it's the least important. Shoot wide open for maximum light to allow you to have fast enough shitter speed and low ISO but you might want to a stop it a stop or two to get better sharpness as some lenses aren't very sharp at widest aperture.

Get some pics up! :) good to see another raw shooter around. :)
Last Edit: Jul 7, 2014 11:15:06 am by i-CONICA
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