Dry / Damp Coral Shipping Methods

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Mike

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Reply #15

Yeah shipping method and the cost of sending heavy water has always been a real bugbear of shipping corals.

This is a really good development, but it's hobbyists attitudes that'll take time to adapt to the idea.

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Hai

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Reply #16

Just a bit worried if this will be known as mistreating corals by NSPCA?

Mike

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Reply #17

I wouldn't have thought so. Corals don't have a consciousness, and so providing it stays alive, how would you define mistreating?

Also, it could be argued this is a safer method than shipping with water, not just a financial benefit.

I think it just needs to be practiced more so people get more experienced with various deviations in the exact method, for different species of coral. Here, HK has gone with arguably the safest, what's essentially a slimy sponge, so it's pretty self contained anyway when disturbed.

Which brings up a good question, we should start a separate topic for categorisation of corals into those that are suitable, GPS, leathers, zoas, etc, those less suitable, but possible, like some LPS and SPS, and those that are unsuitable, like anemones, sponges, etc.
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Reply #18

I understand but just worry that those people who don't know about this could take it the wrong way :(

HK_Fuey

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Reply #19

Just a bit worried if this will be known as mistreating corals by NSPCA?
Have you read the article?
The point Eric Bourneman makes is that for anything with a mucus coated surface (including softies, SPS and LPS), and anything that produces slime under stress (mushrooms, most soft corals, and LPS...not sure about SPS?), then being in a small bag of water for extended periods is a very bad idea.  The slime/mucus contains bacteria and flora that reproduce exponentially and turn the water into soup, which smothers the coral. 

By wrapping it in damp, breathable paper, and putting into a sealed plastic bag, you create 100% humidity which means the coral can breath by gas exchange from the mucus to the air, which is more efficient than the water-in-bag version where it goes mucus-water-air.  Add to that, that the water may now be soup, and the surface tension increased, meaning very poor gas exchange, the coral smothers.

The evidence suggests (collected and documented since the 1930s!) that damp shipping is best for most corals, and as a side benefit, costs less due to not paying for the weight of the water.

I read on another forum, that the preferred method for shipping carpet nems is to dry ship them.  I know I had a BTA shipped in water from London to Newcastle and it arrived in a terrible state.  I've not seen one shipped damp, but I'm open to the suggestion now.
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Mike

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Reply #20

It makes a lot of sense, about the mucus, etc. Just seems crazy, so it'll take a long time for the "general public" of the hobby to get used to the idea.

I'd have thought anemones would have been a definite no no, but that's the point of this new list we can create. It can be edited as we find new info and become a "wiki" of which corals it's ok for, and which it isn't.

Is it limited to corals? What about hermit crabs and snails? Who can live and breathe outside of water pretty much indefinitely so long as they don't dry out. Obviously you wouldn't wrap them, but as you say, 100% humidity with a bit of water and mounds to tissue to crawl over will keep them happy enough I'd think. A list of things that's a definite no no is a good idea too, like sponges, obviously no chance, or tube worms - I think they'd freak out, and anemones? or so I thought.
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HK_Fuey

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Reply #21

Yes, the same forum mentioned crabs and snails too.  I mentioned snails ages ago.  See how this guy packs them here:
How to ship snails? - Invertebrates - Marine Molluscs - ReefBase Marine Fish & Reef Keeping Forum

Off to start that wiki
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Mike

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Reply #22

Oh yeah I remember that now. I sent you those snails with nearly dry, just a little pot of water...
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HK_Fuey

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Reply #23

Yep, and they all survived.
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Reply #24

Nems on our shores are out of water at low tide, not too sure if they walk back under water or stay there until the tide comes back in.
I should really sort this out!!

T-Bone Tyrone

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Reply #25

Nearly forgot, when I got those frags and fish from the woman closing down her tank (but she's now kept it going, but with seahorses) I had to remove all the LR, there was a mahoosive feather duster attached to a big bit of LR,  this worm was out of the water for nearly two hours while I caught all the fish, when I out the LR back in the duster came back out after five mins!
I should really sort this out!!

HK_Fuey

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Reply #26

Thought we better add a comment here to say that the kenya tree survived the trip.  See here: http://reefbase.co.uk/members'-tanks-6/i-conica's-tank-(picture-heavy!)/msg14929/?topicseen#subject_14825
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