Starting Marine - Help

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Hi Everyone,

This is going to be a bit odd but stay with me,

A family friend used to be a massive marine fanatic, he's got approximately got 40 years experience keeping them, as he got older he decided he didn't have the time to tend to his garden and his fish as a result he stuck with his gardening.

He's now 81 years old and can't keep on top of his garden so he wants to return to his marine tank. It's pretty much a given he's going to do it, so now we're at the point in helping him get the best set up possible.

I have concerns about him starting up again, his physical capabilities and set ups.

He find himself unable to bend over, so he doesn't want a set up where everything else is underneath the tank. Nor is he able to lift x amount of water bi weekly for changes (for the next 7 months I'm around to help with that, but after that is a different story). There's very little room behind the tank but theres a possibility of room being towards it's side.

Yesterday I went to see my uncles marine set up (I'm only a tropic keeper myself so I'm not completely with it) but he had his set up underneath the tank but a 'motor' was pushing up the water up a column into the tank (and a RO set up in his garage). I'm just wondering if it would be possible to have something like that set up on the side of the tank at his waist level so he doesn't need to worry about bending over?

Asco1104

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Reply #1

Hi

Sounds tricky, lifting and bending is a hazard of a Marine tank.
What your talking about is a return pump pumps the water out of the sump and into the display, that then goes over weir, in the weir is one or 2 overflow pipes, 1 of these works on a full syphon basis, so if you put the sump higher say at waist height you might not get the necessary length in the pipe to get a syphon to a cure.

 


Tim

ajm83

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Reply #2

What about a tank with an inbuilt sump, like a Red Sea Max? (or I think allpond sell some cheap copies)
Last Edit: Dec 6, 2017 2:58:52 pm by ajm83

HK_Fuey

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Reply #3

Here's someone else's diagram, but it gives you an idea of the sort of thing that's achievable



Jonjamess

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Reply #4

I'm no expert whatsoever! Used to keep marine (with varying degrees of success years ago) and have now started again (with a lot more success). But could he not go for a smaller tank, maybe a nano? Not so much need for a sump and a bit easier to manage with water changes etc! Seeing as he can't really lift stuff..

Asco1104

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Reply #5

He could do, you can get some with filtration in the rear.
If he had a 100l tank would a 10l water change a week be do able?


Tim

Jonjamess

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Reply #6

Depends on the stock and his feeding habits I guess. If he had a skimmer I'm sure a 10% water change would be fine. I usually do 15-20% a week on mine but I'm pretty sure I'm being a bit obsessive!

Rotted

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Reply #7

Hi

Sounds tricky, lifting and bending is a hazard of a Marine tank.
What your talking about is a return pump pumps the water out of the sump and into the display, that then goes over weir, in the weir is one or 2 overflow pipes, 1 of these works on a full syphon basis, so if you put the sump higher say at waist height you might not get the necessary length in the pipe to get a syphon to a cure.

Tim

Not quite with it here, if its a pump that forces the water up how does the siphon come into play? From what I saw with my uncles set up it was three straight pipes that went upwards, all I got told was; he added water to this 'tank' under the main tank, it was kind of three compartments with media (I assume media). He also did a manual water change. Like I said I'm completely oblvious when it comes to marine, I'm intending to start with a Biorb 80litre and a conversion kit so this is way over my head
 
What about a tank with an inbuilt sump, like a Red Sea Max? (or I think allpond sell some cheap copies)

I'll look into this in the morning, but cash isn't a issue he's willing to invest up to 2k GBP into it. He has the tank and stand ready, just need to sort this issue out and good to go

Here's someone else's diagram, but it gives you an idea of the sort of thing that's achievable



Thanks, just going to go ahead and print this off and take it to the aquatic shop and see if they can explain it to me step by step!

I'm no expert whatsoever! Used to keep marine (with varying degrees of success years ago) and have now started again (with a lot more success). But could he not go for a smaller tank, maybe a nano? Not so much need for a sump and a bit easier to manage with water changes etc! Seeing as he can't really lift stuff..

He could do, you can get some with filtration in the rear.
If he had a 100l tank would a 10l water change a week be do able?


Tim

No chance of a smaller tank as he had this one already from when he did keep them. Honestly, if it's a 10l or or 100l change a week he doesn't mind doing it 1l jug at a time, it's more so the accessibility.

Depends on the stock and his feeding habits I guess. If he had a skimmer I'm sure a 10% water change would be fine. I usually do 15-20% a week on mine but I'm pretty sure I'm being a bit obsessive!

For some reason he doesn't want a skimmer. I think this is down to him not having one in the past so doesn't see the need for one. Although I should add at the moment he only wants a couple of fish (if that), he's more interested in live rock than anything else.

I do appreciate the feedback guys, if anyone is concerned for the (few) fish he'll be getting, don't be. If it all goes to hell the odds are the tank will be coming to me with stock in. Just I'll be going from a 100l tropic keeper to a 800/1000l marine!

Asco1104

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Reply #8

I had trouble getting my head around it at first, the smaller pipe wich is attached to the pump is called the return, the other larger pipes are called the overflow. So the return pumps the water from the sump in to the display, the the water goes down the overflow pipe via gravity. A full syphon system is the quietest wich would also rely on the length of pipe to allow a syphon to start, if you put the sump at waist height you shorten the overflow pipe wich will give you problems.
Putting the at ground level as in the picture wouldn’t be a issue though.
Hope that makes sense


Tim

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