newbe tanke size

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Hi to all reading this post, I am looking at getting into marine.
My only problem is I am on crutches from multiple hip replacement operations on the same leg. I hope to be off them soon but lifting heavy weights like water change may be a problem?
The tanks I am looking are Red Sea 170, 250 or 350. My choice of bigger is on if the water chemistry is going wrong I have more of a change of saving the tank, but this will mean bigger water change ie more weight. The 350 I like as the sump is away from the electrical side, to me having the 170 all electrical is above water not sure I like that?
What are your recommendations thanks in advanced
Graham

mightyhatter

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Reply #1

Welcome to ReefBase!

Your point about more water volume helping with parameter stability is absolutely correct. I know lots of people who start small to see if the like it but as a result they are making an already challenging hobby even tougher! I would absolutely recommend going for the biggest you reasonably can (also saves on expensive upgrades!)

From an electrics point of view there is quite a bit of condensation in the sump compartment so if the electrics are in the same cupboard there is minimal impact on the location (in my experience). Some people build a cabinet in the cabinet or have a second cabinet alongside which creates more separation but down to personal preference.

You can get an auto water changer which might be worth investigating if the weight is an issue - these can live on a little trolley and do the change for you

Good luck and hope you are off the crutches soon!

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Mike

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Reply #2

I used to do water changes in my sump. There was no lifting, I’d siphon water away through a hose pipe down the drain, the use gravity as my mixing tub lived in the old immersion heater cupboard upstairs so I’d siphon the new water down stairs.

You could use an electric pump though.
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marine_newbie

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Reply #3

I do it manually with bucket and pump, but hear people are raving about Reefloat auto water changers (AWC)


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ajm83

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Reply #4

Another thing to look into is the no-water-change methods,  such as Triton.

Basically you use carbon (charcoal) and an algae filled refugium to keep the water clean.  You post off water tests 2-3x a year and water changes are only used if tests show specific problems that can't be fixed in other ways.
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marine_newbie

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Reply #5

Another thing to look into is the no-water-change methods,  such as Triton.

Basically you use carbon (charcoal) and an algae filled refugium to keep the water clean.  You post off water tests 2-3x a year and water changes are only used if tests show specific problems that can't be fixed in other ways.
I am using ATI essentials pro but still do water changes although less frequent. Haven’t sent ICP out but do regular testing for NO3, PO4, KH, Ca and Mg. I hear that it usually takes 2wk or so to get ICP results back, which can be a bit late to tackle problems?


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ajm83

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Reply #6

I am using ATI essentials pro but still do water changes although less frequent. Haven’t sent ICP out but do regular testing for NO3, PO4, KH, Ca and Mg. I hear that it usually takes 2wk or so to get ICP results back, which can be a bit late to tackle problems?


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I only really use Triton tests now,  it usually takes them between 3 and 7 days. 
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marine_newbie

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Reply #7

I only really use Triton tests now,  it usually takes them between 3 and 7 days.
Are they done in the UK or sent to Germany?


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ajm83

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Reply #8

Are they done in the UK or sent to Germany?


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UK normally,  only Germany in rare circumstances.  Even then it's usually only 10 days or so.
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Gham

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Reply #9

I like the idea of the triton method, I was under the impression it is not advised to a newbie? Like no sand in the bottom of the tank.

Gham

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Reply #10

@ajm83 Andy I am from Uk 🇬🇧

ajm83

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Reply #11

I like the idea of the triton method, I was under the impression it is not advised to a newbie? Like no sand in the bottom of the tank.

Well kind of...  Their method is not that complex (and besides you don't have to stick rigidly to it).

At it's core, it's just running a skimmer, refugium full of macro algae to keep nitrate/phosphate down, and activated carbon to remove yellowing from the water. Those are the bits that keep the water clean.  You can do those very easily.

As you add stony corals you will need to supplement calcium/alk/magnesium.  But that's the same in any method. 


So what I was getting at was using the Triton method (or similar) with the refugium+carbon to minimise  'day to day' water changes,  and perhaps you could get a ReefFloat Auto Waterchanger (or a pump and some hose) for times when you really do need to do a water change (i.e. an emergency where something is drastically wrong with the water).
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