New tank

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Hi all
Ive recently been handed a red sea cmax 250. It has everythingto get it runing
Execpt live rock and sand.
I was told by my local fish shop to ask about on forums to see if anyone has any live rock they no longer need as it will be cheaper than buying it from a shop.

 Can anyone point me in the right direction please?

Thanks

Steve

marine_newbie

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Reply #1

You will need to cycle your tank. This can be done by adding live rock so the bacteria that break down ammonia, nitrites and nitrates can spread from that live rock to the dead rock. This will take a few wks during which ammonia, nitrites and nitrates typically go high. It can also be done with marine bacteria starter kits. Or combine the two. When I started I used some live rock from LFS but also did the Red Sea bacteria starter kit
If you are after live rock, see if anyone close by is doing a tank breakdown. You can also look at aquarist classifieds. If none Close by then LFS will be able to supply some. A few pieces added to your rock work should be okay to start.


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Leezy

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Reply #2

Hi thanks for the reply, i was going to do the cycle, but need to get sand and rock before i fill the tank, i know its expensive but ive done tropical for years now and wanted to give marine a go. I was under the impression live rock and sand contained the bacteria so wouldnt need to add fish to begin the cycle. I have live bacteria in a bottle waiting but would like to start it and cycle it correctly and with little chemical help as possible really, is this something thats do able or is it enevitable to have to add chemicals to the water in marine?

semiroundel

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Reply #3

Welcome to the friendly forum.
All good things to those that wait: as Hannibal Lecter said, and it's the same with fishkeeping.
I'm rejuvenating a tank that has had live rock since 1996, and I'm still going through the nitrogen cycle, unfortunately, it's an inevitability as with freshwater but the stakes are slightly higher.
One of the things that you need to keep an eye on imho, is the quality of your new water coming into the tank.
I would seriously consider a RODI (reverse osmosis unit with de-ionising resin chamber after it, I'm putting two resin chambers after mine).
Everything depends on water quality, I recently found out, and that doesn't necessarily mean perfect, but not adding bad elements with your saltwater mix/top up water.
There's loads of info here, and you won't be reproached if making a gaffe (i've made a few as some will tell you but not had the proverbial taken out of me, yet)

Thanks:


semiroundel

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Reply #4

No, I was wrong. It was Buffalo Bill who said it.

Thanks:


marine_newbie

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Reply #5

I think you can do it with live rock or live sand alone. Personally I wouldn’t buy live sand as it seems expensive and I would argue that shop storage conditions will impact its ‘live’ status.
Live rock kept in someone’s tank or in tank at LFS is different and will be properly ’live’.
The live starter kits usually contain chemicals with nutrients for the bacteria to allow them to expand and colonise rocks. In an empty tank there will not yet be enough food for the bacteria.It helps to speed things up.


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marine_newbie

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Reply #6

Welcome to the friendly forum.
All good things to those that wait: as Hannibal Lecter said, and it's the same with fishkeeping.
I'm rejuvenating a tank that has had live rock since 1996, and I'm still going through the nitrogen cycle, unfortunately, it's an inevitability as with freshwater but the stakes are slightly higher.
One of the things that you need to keep an eye on imho, is the quality of your new water coming into the tank.
I would seriously consider a RODI (reverse osmosis unit with de-ionising resin chamber after it, I'm putting two resin chambers after mine).
Everything depends on water quality, I recently found out, and that doesn't necessarily mean perfect, but not adding bad elements with your saltwater mix/top up water.
There's loads of info here, and you won't be reproached if making a gaffe (i've made a few as some will tell you but not had the proverbial taken out of me, yet)
+1 to water quality. You can buy RO from LFS, but I found it more economical to invest in a RODI unit. Have it hooked to hose pipe. Might get a booster pump at some point, but working okay.
If you haven’t done yet, get yourself some test kits so you can follow your cycle. Personally I use Red Sea test kits, but loads of people use salifert. Reading the colours can sometimes be an art though


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Ratvan

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Reply #7

Welcome to the forums, I would hunt around locally for someone shutting down there tank or rescaping. Ultimate Reef is pretty good for Livestock and live rock. Although the forum is rather elitist in the other areas. Aquarists Classified is another place

Alternatively you could scape with just dry rock and add a small amount of live to seed it. I don't belive that bacteria in a bottle works but your view may vary, at most it may speed up the cycle.

mightyhatter

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Reply #8

Personally I have found the bacteria in a bottle pretty good for speeding up the cycle a bit, but have always had a nagging feeling there must be something not quite perfect if it happens so quickly! (That said lots of people, professional and amateur, swear by it)


Live rock always used to be the way to set up a tank and there are definite benefits to using it, however it can also bring some problems as you never know what hitchikers/ nasties might be lurking in there! While that is part of the fun for many, I know a lot of people now are doing their set-ups with mainly/ all dry rock as you don't have to worry about this. Some will then introduce a small bit of 'live' rock from a trusted source to help introduce the good stuff while limiting the potential bad!


As with so much in this hobby there are always plenty of different views and opinions and there is rarely a single correct answer! I think a lot of this decision will come down to how much patience you have! (Possibly closely followed by how easy or not it is to find a decent source of live rock!)

Prasanna Jayathilake

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Reply #9

Hi All,
Can you please verify this is (NOT) Red Slime Algae.
This is my first marine aquarium and just started.
Already under Bryopsis attack and yesterday treated with Blue Life USA Flux Rx.
This morning I spotted this and hoping its not red slime algae   
Your time will be much appreciated! 

Ratvan

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Reply #10

Hi All,
Can you please verify this is (NOT) Red Slime Algae.
This is my first marine aquarium and just started.
Already under Bryopsis attack and yesterday treated with Blue Life USA Flux Rx.
This morning I spotted this and hoping its not red slime algae   
Your time will be much appreciated!

It does look like Cyano, can you tell us more about the tank?
Size, Set up, Lights, Latest Test Paramaters
Clean up Crew? Type and number if any

Prasanna Jayathilake

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Reply #11

It does look like Cyano, can you tell us more about the tank?
Size, Set up, Lights, Latest Test Paramaters
Clean up Crew? Type and number if any
Hi Ratvan,
240L tank with MultiLux LED lighting (120cm)
3 Powerheads operating but not at the same time. (I think flow is too much)
Clean up crew, 1 Gobi, 1 shrimp, 2 Nassarius snails
Wednesday I test before introduce Blue Life USA Flux Rx, results are
Salinity 31.4, pH 7.9, Nitrite Nill. Nitrate 15-25 (coloured scale) Calcium 380, KH 6dKH
Residences: 2 clownfish, 1 lemon peel  and few corals

Ratvan

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Reply #12

You could probably do with some more clean up crew. Have a look for Cerith Snails, Astrea Snails, Banded Turban Snails they'll all go for algae on rocks and glass. You will need to manually remove the algae so that it is short enough for the snails to lick off the rocks


Maybe point a powerhead at this part of the tank and see if it is a deadspot causing the issue?

mightyhatter

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Reply #13

Would agree with Ratvan it does look like cyano. To be honest though I wouldn't worry too much as you have found it now before a major outbreak and you should be able to keep it in hand (I have had similar patches in the past).


As suggested some more CUC would be usefui and would agree removing what ever you can of the algae will help get it under control. For the cyano is that plug attached or can you remove it? If you can take it out of the tank I would do that, give the cyano a scrub off with a toothbrush (in some tank water) and rinse then return it to the tank


Looking at your parameters I would say that your Alk seems very low (most people I know aim for between 8-9 and consider under 7 a possible issue). This wouldn't cause your issue alone (I don't believe) but getting it up and keeping it steady wll help with the overall stability in the tank


How established is the tank? If it is still a relatively new set-up those Nitrates are possibly slightly higher than you might want and are probably the major contributor to the green algae (mature systems can run quite high nitrates but younger systems can struggle as they establish)

Prasanna Jayathilake

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Reply #14

Thanks Ratvan & mightyhatter for your replies.
I went to the local aquarium shop but unfortunately, they didn't have any of those snails. (only had few turbo snails. On my request they agreed to get few Astrea Snails by next Thursday. I change right powerhead so the flow will come round and left to right when only it's operating.

Regarding pH, I am trying to get it around 8.3 but it's not going up  :O
Tank is only 3 weeks old. (also my experience)
Yes, that coral is not attached. I will give a clean-up as hatters instructed.

I appreciate you guys help! 


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