Curing liverock in the display tank

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EDIT: Split off from LaurenJ's thread...
...I am also at the point of setting up my first marine aquarium. I have a sump already and have the rest of the filtration equipment ie skimmer powerheads etc on order. I have read a lot on curing and cooking live rock. While I see the point of cooking the live rock with the space I have available it's not really an option. Can I cure or indeed cook the live rock in the aquarium prior to setting the display up. Tank is 200ltr with sump and refugium, looking to use some chaeto and other non sexual algae, with live rock rubble and cocepods in the refugium, add some substrate as well. I am going to use the Triton system. Having a sand base in the tank don't know yet if I will use live sand. Going for reef and want to use only easy to keep  livestock that is reef compatible to begin with. Hopefully this will lead on to my own aquarium project which is in the design stage.
Last Edit: Dec 3, 2015 9:34:04 pm by HK_Fuey
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Reply #1

You could yes but that is going to leach a lot.

I would do it bare bottom with no sand then once sorted fully drain the system and then add sand and fill with fresh salt water that will remove all the nasties and having no sand in there will make things a lot easier to cure ect.


Also use new sand the rock will soon seed it.

Run carbon and phosphate media from the beginning if you going full on reef and get a pellet reactor in there to start seeding it will make things a lot easier for you in the future then with nutrient export ect.


If you going for a reef myself personally use red sea coral pro salt
Last Edit: Dec 3, 2015 5:33:55 pm by Marty

HK_Fuey

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Reply #2

@Angrymac , that's good advice from Marty.  You could do it in the tank.  You may very well need to do some big water changes if there is a lot of die off.

However, if you get good fresh rock, that has cured at the lfs, or you buy some from a well maintained existing tank, you shouldn't get a lot of die off.  In that case, you could add the sand too, set the rock up as you want it, then sit back and wait for it to cycle (anywhere from a week to a couple of months).

You just need to understand the state of the rock before you make a decision which way to go.
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Angrymac

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Reply #3

Thanks for the info fellas, so I could use the tank and clean off the rock in a fresh salt water container and water change the tank which I am happy to do. Could you elaborate on the pellet reactor please? This one was a new one for me hadn't seen that.
 
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Reply #4

Could you elaborate on the pellet reactor please?

Bio-Pellets are a resin like bead media which promotes the growth of bacteria which consume nitrates and phosphates. The bacteria build up into a thick mulm which then comes off and gets skimmed out, removing it from the system.

It takes time for them to build up bacteria and start working properly, so good idea if you plan to use one, to get it in early.

A reactor is just a tube that water is pushed up through, so the media is suspended. It's the most efficient way of exposing any media, carbon, rowaphos, pellets, etc to the tank's water.

So you'd buy a reactor, one with hoses, not an overflowing type, then buy bio pellets. Make sure the effluent tube is directed at the intake of the skimmer.
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Marty

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Reply #5

The TMC 500 pellet reactor would be ideal I run one and can easily be fed into skimmer intake

Angrymac

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Reply #6

Hi all, it's been some time since my last post. I now have the tank up and running and have slowly been introducing the livestock. So far I have added 5 Nassarius snails (now thinking this could have been a mistake), 4 hermit crabs unfortunately the fifth did not seem to take the journey well, the nassarius I believe have seen to the remains. 2 emerald crabs but haven't seen the small one since his introduction. 1 blood shrimp, wife's request but she is unhappy because it has set up home behind the rock. Latest addition 2 clown fish,  from everything I have read these guys are tough and are able to handle tricky conditions. Waiting a couple of weeks after adding the clown fish before thinking about any more. Looking at Chromis or a Damselfish, also another shrimp. Oh and have one Mexican turbo snail, he is large.


Total system is 290 litres, 200 in tank, running some chaeto in the refugium with copepods, have a Jecod 4000 return pump, bubble magus curve 5 skimmer, two Jecod RW 8 powerheads. Using a single LED strip blue white helped by a two tube T5. Hydor 300 watt heater. Going to start the Triton method shortly got to send off the water sample first. All water parameters are zero PH is 8 SG 1.023. Eager to add coral but know that has got to wait.
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Reply #7

Steer clear of damsels and humbugs they are a nightmare !!!

Triton is only worth doing if you plan on having a full blown reef and have a good understanding of water chemistry or you will be throwing money away

And your SG needs to be 1.026
Last Edit: Mar 21, 2016 2:16:07 am by Marty

Angrymac

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Reply #8

Thanks Marty, reading up on water chemistry at the moment and am planning full blown reef. Want to do the whole thing. According to Red Sea the SG should be 1.023 for Soft corals, so interested to now why 1.026, mainly if that is better then will change SG over time.
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Reply #9

Triton is not needed for soft corals as they will not be consuming calcium, magnesium, alkalinity well nothing that a basic waterchange will not easily replenish.

For LPS and SPS that will use it a good set of light will also be needed for them

1.026 or 35ppt is the Salinity of natural sea water anything in your tank will be happy to see it at 1.026 :)

HK_Fuey

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Reply #10

Sounds like you may not have much power in those lights.  What size is your tank?  What power are the lights?
The rule of thumb for anything other than LEDs is 4W/Gallon for low light corals, and 10W/Gallon for high light requirement corals.  That's assuming it's not a deep tank.

Better would be to go with LEDs, as they work out way cheaper over time.
Emerald crabs are territorial.  I had two, and one killed the other whilst in quarantine  :scared:  Two in a big tank would be ok, as they can get away from each other.

Clowns are great characters.  Good choice.

Triton is for hard core coral growth.  It's really only LPS and SPS that need that.  Softies will get all they need from elements that are added through feeding and water changes.
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